A look at the MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) . . . in 2017

MacBook_Late2009

The white polycarbonate unibody MacBooks are officially no more with Apple dropping support for the MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2010), the last of this series, along with several other older models including the 13-inch MacBook Pro (Mid 2009), 15-inch MacBook Pro (Mid 2009) and 15-inch MacBook Pro 2.53GHz (Mid 2009). The end of support means Apple will no carry inventory/parts for nor make repairs to these models should you experience any hardware issues. However, you may be able to find third-party repair shops capable of making repairs albeit potentially expensive repairs.

While these models are considered older, outdated and obsolete by today’s standards, some can still run well if kept in good physical condition and with a few upgrades. For instance, let’s look at the MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) series.

At the time of release, the base model MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) came with a 2.26GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, 2GB of RAM (upgradeable to 4GB* of RAM), NVIDIA GeForce 9400M graphics processor with 256MB of shared memory, a 250GB SATA 5400RPM hard drive (upgradeable to an optional 320GB or 500GB 5400RPM hard drive) and Mac OS X v.10.6 Snow Leopard. Additional features included: 8x Dual-Layer SuperDrive, Gigabit Ethernet, Built-in Airport and Bluetooth, Built-in iSight, Mini DisplayPort, two USB 2.0 ports, 3.5mm audio jack, Kensington lock slot and MagSafe with 60-watt power adapter.

Our MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009), which I coincidentally am using to write this post, was ordered to the base model configuration but customized with 4GB of RAM instead of 2GB of RAM. It’s currently running 8GB* of RAM, a Sandisk 240GB Solid State Drive (SSD) and Apple’s latest operating system, macOS Sierra v.10.12.

While the upgraded MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) is a bit slower than the new MacBook product lines (and quite a bit heavier), it still performs quite well and gives our MacBook some new life. From running the latest applications to surfing the web, streaming audio and video, social media and so forth, the MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) can still deliver and get the job done. And of course, if you need the SuperDrive and all those traditional ports, they are available on this model.

 

*The MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) can support up to 8GB of RAM. The 4GB of RAM limit is based upon Apple’s official specifications at the time of product release. When upgrading to 8GB of RAM (2 x 4GB modules), verify that the RAM modules have been certified to work in the MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009). Some RAM modules may not be supported in the MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) at the 8GB limit.

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